Building Chords, Easy Music Theory

by: Sean Daniel

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[0.14]
one question that I get asked a lot is how I stay so fit and handsome into my late 20s most of the other questions I get are about guitar chords now when you first start out in your first playing guitar chords are just kind of hand shapes that you learn to move around and basically you're just memorizing them now one of the best ways to really advance that guitar and something that's gonna be great for your playing no matter how long you've been playing is having a fundamental understanding of how these shapes work now it's also a lot of confusion because the naming system can be completely confusing if you don't understand it from a fundamental level like what's the difference between major chords and minor chords and how they interact with each other etc etc so we're gonna do is actually put the guitar down grab a piece of paper and a pen and talk about that the fundamentals of how chords are made okay now I know a lot of you are probably like man this is stupid I just want to play well get over yourself for like one minute and pay attention because this is super important and it's gonna make everything you do from here on out so much easier to understand once you just kind of get these basic concepts down so we're gonna start by writing out the notes in the key of C major now if you don't know how to come about these notes we can talk about that later but right now we're just gonna assume that you know the notes in C major are c d e f G a and B okay so that's it that's all of C major just written out for you now the rules that apply to this apply to any key we're just using C because it's not really messy if there aren't any sharps or flats all hotels okay so the first thing we're gonna do is we're gonna assign each one of these letters a number so C is gonna be one because it's what's called the root note of the scale D is to use three FS for G is five a-six B seven so on and so forth alright so now we want to figure out how these seven notes combine to make different chords so let's start with most important one in the scale which is gonna be sieved major now it's pretty simple any major chord is gonna be what's called a triad now the definition of a triad is just a chord with three different notes there's a very precise formula that goes along with this so a C major triad ax you just take the first note the third note and the fifth note and combine them now these three notes together see E and G will make a C major chord now there are a lot of different ways that we can combine these all these different ways are gonna be called different voicings and some voicings you'll probably find more familiar with another but this is just a bit now if you can't notice when you go one three five like that we're just skipping a note every time now this is actually a really important concept because it will tell you all the other chords in this key now the difference between major and minor other than you know minor chords sound kind of sad major chords sound a little more happier and uplifting is that in any key in a major key the first fourth and fifth notes are going to become major chords and the second third and six notes are going to become minor chords now what that means is any of these seven notes just single pitches all by themselves have the potential to become a triad chord now that we haven't talked about is the seventh one B this is going to be a diminished triad ax which doesn't really sound super pleasing to the ear but it definitely has this place in music and like rock and pop you don't hear it too much but it's definitely worth talking about so the way you find out which chords go with each other like I said the lon four and five are all gonna become major chords two three and six rather with a minor you just do the same thing you did with the SIA you want one skip to note three skip to note five so if we want to find out what DS chord in the key of C is we already know this since it's the second one it's gonna be a minor chord well a D minor is gonna be d skip one F skip wanna a 'yes cord is gonna be e skip one G skip one B so eg and B are gonna make a minor F for is a major chord F a all the way back to the beginning C facu that's F major G major also sounds good with this chief skip one B skip one d a6 is minor a c e B this is B diminished so it's court is gonna be B D and F now there's a lot of different types of chords and once you kind of see this as your framework for building them all the names of the chords are gonna make sense like for a major seven all you do is just add the seventh note from there and so I will probably do another video discussing that but basically that's it now you've got a collection of seven chords all of which are gonna sound quote-unquote good together and you can make a progression just by randomly choosing which one's work together like you don't think a C major F major G major progression that's gonna be really happy and uplifting you can go a minor D minor an E minor and that's gonna sound great too but basically that is the



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Learn the basic elements of chord-building that can be applied to any instrument. The major scale is all you need to know to make any major or minor chord in any musical key on guitar, piano or anything else. Listen to the new album: iTunes: https://goo.gl/kQCrbv

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Website: www.seandanielmusic.com

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